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Suran Dickson

Let's talk about sex

Tuesday May 17, 2011

Today is International Day Against Homophobia. Perfect opportunity for a Big Question - why do some people hate us gayers? Why does my natural drive to create home and family with somebody of the same sex, rile some folk so much that they deny me the right to formalise my relationship through marriage, openly claim that me teaching their children will be harmful, and suggest there is some secret, perverted agenda behind my desire to live a life without discrimination. At first glance, we'd have to assume it's to do with the kind of sex we have; this is what sets us aside by title and 'lifestyle' from our heterosexual friends. So let's talk about sex…

What consenting adults of either gender do with their bodies is none of my business, nor anyone else's. I have no more than a human curiosity about other people's sex lives, however, some homophobes mention gay sex with such frequency that one has to question their underlying fascination. I'm more interested in how we relate to one another, than what we do to get off. But to stay on sex for a moment (I know it's tough, hang in there), many LGBT people lead unadventurous, boring or even asexual lives together; many heterosexuals do the opposite. Above and beyond the biological implications of body parts, sexual behaviour is NOT defined by your orientation - most would agree that within a loving, respectful and consenting environment, people are free to explore whatever they like.

Homophobia is hardly about sexual behaviour at all. It's about gender. Allow me to demonstrate.

What seems to offend homophobes most is that LGBT people are stepping outside of our gender roles; with our sexual activity, but mostly by our social behaviour. And there is directly proportional discrimination in response to the level of gender subversion. In fact, there is an unconscious ranking system at play.  Arguably, a glamorous lesbian couple are far more likely to be accepted (in fact 'encouraged' in many male minds…) than a butch lesbian couple. Why? They are both homosexual and should therefore suffer the same castigation. Effeminate men are more likely to be abused in the street, effeminate black men even more so; yes, race plays a part in the gender game, as does class.

I have asked young people to explain to me why I am ok and my gay brothers are not…we are both breaking the rules they impose, why the different punishments? 'It's what they do Miss, it's disgusting'. And we all know what they're getting at here. We're talking about defying the natural order in the worst possible way. It is (drum roll please)…man taking the role of woman (feel free to take a break here to flinch and gasp…).

We are only just breaking free of a longstanding patriarchy, ladies and gentlemen, and the shackles, whilst looser and allowing movement, still weigh us down in the form of gender constructs. Historically, men have ruled and women have been submissive. While things are far more equal now (although the gender pay gap and the gender distribution of world leaders is still woeful), you need only to listen to young children playing to know that all things 'girl' are less than all things 'boy'.  Girls hardly ever insult each other with 'you're such a boy', whereas being called a girl is only one step higher than being called gay in the minds of young men. Anything feminine is to be shunned vociferously; 'boys will be boys' becomes 'boys MUST be boys'.

A woman who challenges her gender role by being a lesbian, particularly a butch lesbian, usurps the position of man and might expect some reverberations from those who struggle with this concept (corrective rape in South Africa is an extreme example of these reverberations). And a man who might have feminine traits, hobbies or god forbid, takes the 'role of a woman' sexually, is the lowest of the low and provokes such anger in 'real men' that he can expect to face violence. This may not resonate with some of you, but ask yourself why we have such different reactions to gay men and lesbians? Isn't the same norm being offended?

So here are the rules for those who missed the pamphlet in the post:

  1. Lesbians are mostly ok in public (if you look a bit manly though, watch out, you're running the risk of watering down an insecure male's masculinity and must be held accountable)
  2. Feminine lesbians are ok to hold hands in public
  3. Feminine lesbians are more-than-ok sexually
  4. Gay men who look like Gareth Thomas (muscular & virile) are ok in public
  5. Gay men are not ok to hold hands in public (unless they're as big as Gareth Thomas or are indulging their perversion in a gay ghetto like Soho)
  6. Gay men are never ok sexually (except, boys, secretly in your heads where you are confused, ashamed and angry at your perfectly normal curiosity)

I would wager a month's salary on the latter confusion being what led to 17 year old Adam Ayres and three of his friends luring a gay man via a chat room to a park where they smashed his skull in with a baseball bat (http://bit.ly/ktW7A9). His lawyer claimed he wasn't homophobic, he'd just been 'trying to assert his masculinity'. This would be laughable if it weren't so serious. I don't hold people down and paint their nails to assert my femininity. We are letting our young people down in a serious way by not challenging society's rather sad and unintelligent obsession with gender. Let our boys, girls, men and women be people first. Let them explore their natural talents and creativity without repercussion. And most importantly let them love who, and how, they want.

Quick disclaimer: Most of this is not subject matter for our school visits as role models. This is for you; our 'mature' reader.

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